Entry 12

Thursday is a real slog, four hours straight of teaching and then a two break followed by two hours of lecture. As I had bit h an EU law tutorial and lecture, I will put them together, followed by land law and finally a brief bit on contract law.

The first EU tutorial was actually great by us diving straight into the content. We examined the nature of the various institutions within the EU and what each institution’s interests are. This helps us looked at the next section of the class, which is the concept of institutional balance and does this lead to a democratic deficit? Just to clarify, an institutional balance does not equate to each institute having the same or equal power. Instead, it is about making sure that each institution is staying within its powers provided by the various treaties and not encroaching on another institution’s powers. If there is overlap (or claim of encroachment), then it is up to the European Court of Justice to determine who can use the power. This links to the democratic deficit as there is lack of participation in the elections of the European Parliamentary Elections and there is no direct say for the people in other areas. In class, some colleagues were okay with this, due to it being a free choice and the supranational state gets it powers from elected parliaments across the continent (it’s not direct democracy). I, however, vehemently disagree and think that if you want to improve participation, then compulsory voting should be enforced. If everyone is forced to vote, then they will have to educate themselves to make an informed decision, nor can people complain about the lack of representation (compulsory voting should also be in the national elections). The lecture was about Brexit, and this is in the news, I would just say as before; treaties matter (I am sure that this will come up again).

Land law can be summed down to two questions. What is the nature of the rights given in regards to the land? Secondly, how was the right created? (What is the formality?) This is to say that process of creating a proprietary right, helps determine whether or not it is a right proprietary means (or if it is one in the first place). I know a tautology of sorts (How can we determine the first question without the second? However, it is important to note that rights are limited to what they can be, and thus the process is vital. Why? Certainty. The more certainty there is, the easier it is to complete a transaction. It’s business and essential business in the UK in the recent history of the last 100 years given the rise of property owners. There are a few exceptions to this, but this is more for a practical sense for government departments not be swamped. The only issue for the exceptions is that those who are most likely to be affected, do not know. So there should be a concerted effort to improve knowledge about this. Maybe a topic in PSHE at school?

Finally, I had an introductory tutorial in contract law. The problem was that I did not read the handouts properly and proceeded to answer the questions for next class… Well, at least the effort will not go to waste.

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